Request for Proposal (RFP)

ECHO Journal: Ask the Expert January 27, 2012

“What is a “request for proposal”? The association I belong to needs to have some roofing and siding work done, and I’ve been told that the best way to get contractors to bid the job is to provide them with a proposal request. What type of information needs to be in the document?

A “request for proposal” (commonly referred to as RFP) is a document drafted by a building owner or association that formally requests bid solicitation for material, services, construction, or repair of a building, system, or component. Commonly used when soliciting bids on larger projects, RFPs are increasingly being used by associations on smaller jobs as a tool to clarify and detail the work being desired. An RFP usually contains specific information about the services being requested, and the information necessary for a bid proposal to be considered by the association. Along with a scope of work, a RFP can ensure that contractors bidding on the job are bidding to perform the work in the same manner with the same material.

Repairs to buildings and components of a Common Interest Development are often very specific and must be done on a periodic basis with minimal impact on the residents. Although repairs to a complex may be major (siding or roof replacement) or minor (replacing light fixtures, signage), specifying the needs of the association with how the work is done and what is expected of the contractor will always lead to a better overall project.

Associations are charged with the responsibility to maintain and repair the complex and ensure that the repairs to a complex are performed by qualified contractors and properly done in an efficient manner. Creating an RFP can be a valuable tool when requesting any repairs or reconstruction. A RFP can be a simple one page document or it can be more detailed depending upon the size of the work being requested and the needs of the association. It can be drafted by the association, a construction consultant, or a project manager.

As a basic template, a RFP should have two main parts. The first part would contain a summary of the work to be performed, the general expectations of the association during the course of the project, an estimated time frame for the work to be done, a scope of work listing methods of installation and materials to be used, and any special requirements the association may have with regards to access to the units, where material may be stored, and parking of company vehicles.

The second part of the RFP should detail the submission requirements for contractors presenting proposals. Determine what information you will need from each bidding contractor to ensure that the firm is qualified and capable to do the work. Ask the contractor to describe how the work will be performed and how the contractor will address any special issues associated with the job. This section should also require contractors to state they are properly licensed and equipped to perform the work, the contact information of the company and foreman on the job, certificates of insurance for general liability, professional liability, and workers compensation.

The RFP should clearly state the date proposals are to be submitted, and the date a decision will be made to award the contract. Be sure to request a list of at least three previous jobs that closely reflect the work being anticipated Prior to selecting a bid proposal, someone from the association must inspect the properties listed as a reference to determine if the quality of the work performed meets with their satisfaction.
Sending out an RFP will inevitably trigger phone calls and questions from bidding contractors and requests for site visits to review the project. Associations should appoint one individual to handle all of the information requests and site visits to ensure each contractor sees and receives the same information. This person could be a committee member, a construction consultant, or project manager, and should be familiar with the project and the association’s needs.

It is important to remember that bidding a job takes time and manpower that a contractor normally does not charge for. Reputable contractors will not bid jobs that are poorly defined, and they are hesitant to work with associations that do not appear to be organized, do not have a single point of contact, or cannot make timely decisions. Even in these tough economic times, good contractors will be selective in who they will work for, and under what conditions. If a request for bids is not clearly stated, it will be harder for an association to determine if the bidding contractors are truly qualified and whether they are actually bidding on the same work

As a final note, when you do ask contractors to submit proposals for work, it is professional courtesy to notify each of the firms submitting proposals the outcome of the bid review. Whether a contractor is awarded a proposal or not, they have invested a lot of time in preparing the bid and they deserve to be told what the board decided. A proper notice should include the statement that the association has chosen not to accept the contractor’s proposal, and that they appreciated the time and effort the contractor spent in preparing their bid. This can be done via a letter, an email, or a simple phone call.

John R Schneider is a licensed General Building Contractor, and certified Code Specialist. Since 1985, he has been president of All About Homes, Inc., an East Bay consulting company that specializes in the investigation of construction related deficiencies, the management of projects, and the facilitation of disputes between owners, associations, and vendors. Mr. Schneider is a member of the ECHO Maintenance Panel. Questions or comments can be directed to Mr. Schneider at jrschneider@allabouthomes.com.